Posts Tagged ‘Christian Fantasy’

If you’re looking to purchase gifts for Christmas from the Mightier Than the Sword UK online store, then today is the LAST day that you can do that. As it takes at least two working days to process orders, we will do our best to process any orders placed after today before we close for Christmas on 19th December.

You will still be able to order items from the online store and there will be online help available to advise you of processing times during the closure of the offices. Our offices reopen on 8th January 2018 when we will recommence the processing of all back orders in the order that they were received. Our standard processing time on an order is between two and five working days. The reason for the processing time is down to making appointments with our authors in order to get books signed. (We can’t keep them in their cages all the time).

If you have any questions about an order you have placed or any of our products, then please feel free to contact the online store.

The following items are available from the online store:

Paperbacks
  • A Miracle of Grace by Harry Mirfin
  • Brothers by Marlena R. Smith
  • In Exchange by Steven M. Caddy
  • We Do Not Kill Children (Book 1, Tales from Ragaris) by Penelope Wallace
  • The 10th Province of Jaryar (Book 2, Tales from Ragaris) by Penelope Wallace
  • FATE (Book 1, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • WAR (Book 2, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • WIFRITH (Book 3, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • DOUBT (Book 4, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • SKANE (Book 5, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • SHIPWRECKED (Book 6, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • FEAR (Book 7, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • HOME (Book 8, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • The Arm Rings of Yngvar Collection (Books 1 to 8, The Children of Ribe) by C.S. Woolley
  • WYRD (Book 1, The Children of Snotingas) by C.S. Woolley
  • HILD (Book 2, The Children of Snotingas) by C.S. Woolley
  • Rising Empire: Part 1 (Book 1, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • Rising Empire: Part 2 (Book 2, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • Rising Empire: Part 3 (Book 3, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • Shroud of Darkness (Book 4, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • Lady of Fire (Book 5, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • End of Days (Book 6, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • Rising Empire Trilogy (Books 1 to 3, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • Shroud of Darkness Trilogy (Books 4 to 6, The Chronicles of Celadmore) by C.S. Woolley
  • A Thief in Stickleback Hollow (Book 1, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • All Hallows’ Eve in Stickleback Hollow (Book 2, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • Mr. Daniel Cooper of Stickleback Hollow (Book 3, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • The Day the Circus came to Stickleback Hollow (Book 4, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • A Bonfire Surprise in Stickleback Hollow (Book 5, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Die (Book 6, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • 12 Days of Christmas in Stickleback Hollow (Book 26, The Mysteries of Stickleback Hollow) by C.S. Woolley
  • Beginnings (Book 1, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • Medusa (Book 1.1, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • Siren’s Call (Book 1.2, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • Shadow (Book 1.3, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • A Shot in the Dark (Book 1.4, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • From Out of the Ashes (Book 1.5, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • The Murder of Michael Hollingsworth (Book 1.6, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • The Case of Mrs. Weldon (Book 1.7, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
    • Hunting the Priest Killer (Book 1.8, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
  • Murder in the First (Book 2.4, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
  • Sabrina (Book 2.5, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren) by C.S. Woolley
  • Filling the Afterlife from the Underworld: Volume 1 (Book 1, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren – Case Files) by C.S. Woolley
  • Filling the Afterlife from the Underworld: Volume 2 (Book 2, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren – Case Files) by C.S. Woolley
  • Filling the Afterlife from the Underworld: Volume 3 (Book 3, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren – Case Files) by C.S. Woolley
  • Filling the Afterlife from the Underworld: Volume 4 (Book 4, Nicolette Mace: the Raven Siren – Case Files) by C.S.Woolley
  • The Merchant of Venice (Shakespeare Simplified) by C.S. Woolley and William Shakespeare
  • The Merchant of Venice Workbook (Shakespeare Simplified) by C.S. Woolley and William Shakespeare
  • The Merchant of Venice Teacher’s Guide (Shakespeare Simplified) by C.S. Woolley and William Shakespeare

You can also get a range of exclusive posters, gift sets, postcards and other merchandise from the online store as well as the debut EP of the acoustic rock duo, The Tinderbox, entitled The Tortoise and the Hare.

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With Christmas fast approaching and the release of the second of the Tales from Ragaris, we thought it would be a good idea to remind you all of what makes these two offerings from author, Penelope Wallace, such perfect Christmas gifts.

We Do Not Kill Children

book-new-214x300“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

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The 10th Province of Jaryar

Front Cover 10th ProvinceTo the hall with six flames
Call the great of the nine
For an heir to the king.
They will seek for a sign.

Who should rule the powerful land of Jaryar when its childless king dies? Instead of preparing for war, the two contenders agree to that extraordinary thing, an election.

“A contest? A duel? A game of chess?”
“Yes, perhaps. A fair game.”

Fifty-one high-ranking men and women will hear the arguments, and then choose between Queen Nerranya of Marod and Duke Haras of Vard.

So everyone comes to the peaceful city of Vach-roysh, capital of the land that gave up its independence long ago – the Tenth Province of Jaryar.

They bring their prejudice and ambition, bribery and blackmail – and the prophecy uttered by a dying woman.

And murder. For this game is far from fair.

Bowing down to be raised
For the Dream, and God’s law –
But the sheep, they all wait
For mild peace or grim war.

Cover Base

 

It’s out now! Get your copy of the 10th Province of Jaryar today, just in time for Christmas.

Front Cover 10th ProvinceTo the hall with six flames

Call the great of the nine

For an heir to the king.

They will seek for a sign.

Who should rule the powerful land of Jaryar when its childless king dies? Instead of preparing for war, the two contenders agree to that extraordinary thing, an election.

“A contest? A duel? A game of chess?”

“Yes, perhaps. A fair game.”

Fifty-one high-ranking men and women will hear the arguments, and then choose between Queen Nerranya of Marod and Duke Haras of Vard.

So everyone comes to the peaceful city of Vach-roysh, capital of the land that gave up its independence long ago – the Tenth Province of Jaryar.

They bring their prejudice and ambition, bribery and blackmail – and the prophecy uttered by a dying woman.

And murder. For this game is far from fair.

Bowing down to be raised

For the Dream, and God’s law –

But the sheep, they all wait

For mild peace or grim war.

Amazon Kindle

Amazon Paperback

Direct from Mightier Than the Sword UK

With the manuscript for the sequel to We Do Not Kill Children in the hands of our editors, we’ve decided to celebrate with an extract from Penelope Wallace‘s debut novel and transport all you lovely readers to the kingdom of Marod.

We Do Not Kill Children: An Extract

Meril woke early, but lay still and tense, shivering a little and dreading getting up.  It was hard to believe that they were really going to do this thing.

Master Hassdan had spent most of the day before arranging it.  He told her that nothing would make the inhabitants of the house accept a desecration of the children’s graves; any explanation he could offer would be regarded as an insult.  So Mistress Soumaki was to undertake further questioning of Lord Gahran’s people that afternoon, all together in the hall, to keep them out of the way.  Soumaki plainly thought this a waste of time, and a distraction from their task, and said so forcefully.  The possibility that the children might have been substituted was a very faint and unlikely one.  Hassdan was in charge of the mission, so she had to give way, but she did not like it.  Meril, excruciatingly embarrassed, had to witness their argument.

As they left the room, Master Hassdan had relieved his feelings by slapping the back of her head, and saying, “Take that smirk off your face.  Go and make yourself useful in the kitchens.”  While she was doing this, he exerted the authority of the King’s Thirty over the two reluctant priests, and talked to Captain Rabellit, whom Cremdar had left in charge.  The captain was willing to help, he told Meril, but she had to select the least talkative of her soldiers to assist.  “Not that there’s much hope.  Someone will surely let it out.

Meril, chopping vegetables and apologising for the ones she dropped on the floor, had been trying to learn what the dead children had looked like, but she had discovered little.  They were all little angels.  Gascor had a mole next to his eye.  Ilda’s hair was curly, and Filana’s straight.  This was all she could learn, apart from the colours of the clothes they had been wearing that day.

She had asked several people about the events of the funeral, and learned these by heart.  Cremdar, Arvill and Braf had wrapped the children in a sheet and sewn it together “out of respect”, before breaking the news and arresting Dorac.  The actual bodies had been too terrible to be viewed, after what that monster had done to them.   All anyone else had seen was the bloodstains on Dorac’s cloak, and on the floor, and seeping through the sheet… and the fact of the children’s absence.  The remains had lain in the chapel with those of their father for an hour or so, for last rites to be spoken, and people to pray.  Then they had been carried out into the grounds by Captain Rabellit and one of her soldiers, with everyone else following behind.  Lord Gahran’s chaplain had spoken the words of the funeral service, and all had wept and crowded round while the bloodied sheet was placed in the earth, in a hole dug by the soldiers.  The other body, that of the stablehand Arator, had been buried later.

“Very very odd,” commented Master Hassdan.  “Not even a coffin.”  It was clear, he said, and Meril earnestly agreed, that the people of Ferrodach could have had no part in anything suspicious after the murders, at any rate.  Captain Rabellit seemed trustworthy, and she was sure the grave had not been disturbed since.  When asked if Ferrodach had had enough warning of their arrival to organise a substitution, she had thought not.  “Our scouts saw nothing, and when we rode up, everyone was very surprised.  Or seemed to be.”

So today they were to dig up corpses.  Meril could not get her mind off this, wondering how horrible the sight and smell would be, and if she would disgrace herself utterly – throw up, or scream, or worse, in front of everyone.  She thought of pictures at home of the opening of the tombs at the Last Judgment, which had given her and her sister nightmares.  Her stomach was cold and heavy, and she could not make herself move from her pallet outside the Ferrodach guest chamber.

Meril!  You good-for-nothing brat!  Are you intending to sleep till noon?  St John preserve me from idle children.”  Hassdan kicked her up, and she stammered apologies.  He was still complaining loudly about her laziness and clumsiness as they went down to the hall (the same stair that Master Dorac and Master Cremdar had used that day), and Soumaki gave her a compassionate look.  It was almost funny.

 

We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.

Well Christmas is well and truly done, so we shall be moving on into the New Year, but before we do, we have one more festive offering for you in the form of a Christmas interview with lovely Penelope Wallace.

If you haven’t read her debut novel, We Do Not Kill Children, we highly recommend that you check it out.

Penelope Wallace Christmas Interview

Your favourite day of Christmas from the song “Twelve Days of Christmas”?

A: The lords a-leaping and ladies dancing would make for a good ceilidh or barn dance.

If you had to be Scrooge or the Grinch, which would you be?

A: I am always Scrooge-ish about Christmas beginning too early.

Tell us about this book. Who did you write this book for?

A: “We Do Not Kill Children” is a not-too-dark story of murder and intrigue, in a pseudo-medieval setting with gender equality. I wrote it for people like me, who find swords and honour enthralling, don’t understand technology, like women to have roles other than love interest, and don’t want to read about rape.

What is your favourite part about preparing for Christmas?

A: Possibly opening cards and guessing who they’re from. Also seeing family.

Is there a central message in the book?

A: There are two: heroism is the daily trudge as well as the dramatic leap; and every criminal justice system needs a Court of Appeal.

What is your favourite Christmas Tradition?

A: Carols, and presents.

What is the most important idea you share in your book that will add value to the reader’s life?

A: Possibly to treat people as individuals, and not stereotype them, eg by gender or appearance.

Who is in charge of cooking Christmas dinner in your house?

A: Definitely not me. Normally my husband.

If you could compare this book with any book out there we might already be familiar with, which book would it be and why?

A: Fold “Brother Cadfael” into “Song of Ice and Fire” and add feminism.

If you could spend Christmas anywhere, where would it be?

A: At home is good.

Why did you start writing?

A: It is the obvious way to preserve and develop the strange images and story-lines in my head. Maybe.

Do your characters celebrate Christmas?

A: They certainly do, and you can watch them doing it in the epilogue of “We Do Not Kill Children”.

Will it be a White Christmas?

A: Probably not.

What is your favourite Christmas song?

A: “God rest ye merry” and “Hark the herald angels sing” are excellent carols. If you mean secular song… how about “There’s only one more sleep till Christmas”?

When do you decorate your tree?

A: As late as possible, before Christmas Eve.

Which movie do you watch every Christmas?

A: The classic “Muppet Christmas Carol” (see above under “Song”) but “Love Actually” is also frequently watched.

Do you have a favourite book that you always read over the festive period?

A: No, but I sometimes read Milton’s “Ode on the Morning of Christ’s Nativity”.

We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.

Well for 5th Day of Christmas we are sticking with the fantasy genre, but we are switching authors to Penelope Wallace and an extract from her debut novel, We Do Not Kill Children.

We Do Not Kill Children – An extract

Dorac had always hated being stared at.  He stood, flanked by guards, in the centre of the White Hall in Stonehill Castle.  Around three sides crammed men, women and children.  Most though not all he knew, and every eye was fixed on him.

Fifteen years ago, he had sworn his oath to King Arrion’s mother in this hall.  Since then, he had received orders here, and delivered reports, and greeted new brothers and sisters.  It was the centre of the life of the King’s Thirty.

The long whitewashed walls glared in on him.

Before him on the left was a table with the holy gospel, on which the witnesses swore.  The priest, a short scowling woman, stood by, and the King’s Questioner, Lady Kara.  On the right, another table with that cloak, his cloak, stiff with blood.  The witnesses sat behind.  Cremdar looked troubled, Arvill looked distraught, and Braf looked like nothing.

The eyes burned into him, and raised sweat.

He answered what turned out to be the last question, and was told to step forward and take the oath.  His right hand on the open book, hearing himself stumble over the words, he swore that the evidence he had given was true.  He knew that no one believed him.

The eyes shifted away, and he was cold.  Everyone looked – Dorac looked – at the man sitting on the dais at the north end.  King Arrion, his lord for nine years.  His lord, his friend, his brother.  Everyone else had been staring at him because they believed him guilty.  The King looked away for the same reason.

“Your Grace, do you wish to retire to consider?” asked Lady Kara.

“No.  But he may sit down.”  So someone brought him a stool, but he ignored it.  He waited.  Fought the knowledge of doom coming.  All around the walls, a hiss of talk.   Dorac could not hear words.  He could guess.

(“He murdered three children, and thought the King would approve.  One of the Thirty!  Why is it taking so long?  What is there to decide?”)

The King stood up.  Silence beyond imagining.

“Dorac Kingsbrother, I find you guilty of the murders of Ilda aged twelve years, Gascor aged nine years, and Filana aged five years.”

It still seemed impossible.

Hands on his shoulders, pushing him to his knees.  Blood pounded behind his face.  Possible and actual.  At least he would soon be dead.

“You have served my mother and me and this land with great loyalty for many years.  I do not doubt that you thought what you did was for the best.  Words were spoken at Council that may have helped you to believe this.  But whatever your motives, it was an abominable act.

“From this day, and forever, you are exiled from this land, and from the fellowship of the Thirty.   If you are still within the realm one week from today, or if you ever return without the King’s word, your life is forfeit.

“I take back your companionship, I take back your land and your gold to comfort the bereaved, I take back your horse and your armour.”  He paused.  “Your sword you may retain.  Go from here, make a better life, and may God forgive you.”

We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.

For the third day of advent we are taking a trip to the world of Ragaris, created by Penelope Wallace. You may have seen that her debut novel is one of Amazon’s hot releases in the Christian Fantasy genre, so with the run up to the celebration of the birth of Christ, here’s a specially written short story of Christmas straight from the country of Marod.

If you want to find out more about her debt novel, We Do Not Kill Children, you can read more here. This tale takes place a few years before the events of her debut novel and is a wonderful story about the power of giving.

The Queen’s Gift

Every Christmas Eve, the city was darkened save for a single torch carried to the Cathedral by a girl on a donkey – and then candles and lamps and rushlights were lit for everyone to take home.

The light comes again: long ago and far away in Bethlehem, but somehow also here and now in Stonehill.

That year the royal family walked back with their lantern to sleep a little; and next morning, like other parents, the Queen and King gave their children gifts. To Princess Emmia they gave a new bow, and she stroked it lovingly. “Now I can defend myself.”

“Yes, but you must still take soldiers with you.” The Queen didn’t like to think of what had almost happened, six weeks ago.

“I won’t take that soldier, Mother.”

“I am not hearing this again. He saved your life.”

“And he disobeyed my orders, a Princess’s orders. I want him punished. Flog him, as a Christmas gift to me?” She put her head on one side with a childish smile, inappropriate in a woman of nineteen.

“An odd gift, I think. Run along and dress for Mass.”

Later came the Christmas feast in the Great Hall. After Advent plainness, the mere smell of meat – heavy, warm, almost solid – might have filled stomachs. The Hall was full of noise, and men and women in bright gowns and merry mood.

On the dais Queen Darisha sat with her family (husband, two sons, daughter, sister and brother-in-law) and selected guests. And when her people could spare a glance from the food, they looked up, and they seemed reassured.

She was fifty-two years old, and had reigned for eighteen years. Her face was round and motherly, so that royal dignity was always an effort, but her eyes, she hoped, were still sharp. On this glad day she wore a purple gown trimmed at the bodice with foreign lace, and at the sleeves with ermine, and on her piled –up grey-streaked hair she wore the crown of Marod, gold and pearl and a single sapphire.

Members of the Queen’s Thirty stood around the walls. The most beloved of all her servants, sworn to defend her with their lives.

Those at the High Table ate and drank and talked, and were careful always to look happy; and after a steady hour and a half the songs had been sung, the bones picked, and the plates emptied. Tables were pulled back to clear the centre of the Hall… and all looked up together, expectant like baby birds, with open beaks.

It was time for the Queen to do what Queens must: reward those who have proved loyal, bribe those who may need persuasion. The Christmas Giving.

She stood, and the herald called names, and happy people knelt to receive lands forfeited by criminals, or other gifts found or made. There was cheering.

The afternoon was fading, and the shutters were fastened. Light from the torches flickered, dancing on the familiar faces, changing them.

Finally. Her feet were aching. “Dorac, son of Araf, approach.”

Now, Emmia. Listen.

The young soldier had to be pushed towards the dais, stumbling a little. He was clean, but his dull jacket and hose were patched, and his hair tied back with string. A confused and unbeautiful face.

The Queen said, “Forty nights ago, a woman of this Court was set upon by scoundrels intending robbery, or perhaps rape and murder. You and another fought them off, killed or captured them. That deserves praise, and praise has been given. Then you were ordered to kill your prisoners, and you refused, because you said trial should come before punishment.”

Now he was looking very nervous.

“Kneel.

“I don’t know what happens elsewhere, but in this kingdom even the great should keep the law, and even the lowly may tell them so. Take this, Dorac, with my gratitude.”

And he looked up at her. She saw his face, his life, change. She almost wept.

The gift was a sword – good, but not extraordinary. She trusted it would serve him well. He took it as if he’d never seen one before, and had to be nudged by the Steward to get up, and bow, and walk away.

“Do you know, mother,” said the Princess afterwards, “he looked as if he’d never had a Christmas gift from anyone before.”

“Maybe he hadn’t.”

The Queen thought of her dear friends, her Queen’s Thirty. They would all be willing to die for her.

But Dorac, she thought, would feel that was too great a privilege.

We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.