Posts Tagged ‘We Do Not Kill Children’

Well it’s a big news day for all of us here at Mightier Than the Sword UK. Whilst most of the population of the UK is dying in the heat, we’re celebrating some wonderful events!

The first is the launch party for Penelope Wallace, it takes place tonight, 26th May 2017, at the Middle Street Resource Centre in Beeston. Penelope will be on hand to talk about her book We Do Not Kill Children and the upcoming sequel! It’s a free event, so if you are in the area, feel free to come along and meet with Penelope!

Penny Release Party Poster

We’re also celebrating a week of school workshops that C.S. Woolley has just completed. Running a variety of different sessions including Viking myths and storytelling, Developing character backstory, how to build a book world and writing your own fairy tale, C.S. visited Sherwood Junior School in Nottinghamshire, Mottram Academy in  Cheshire and Marton and District C of E Primary School in Cheshire.

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C.S. Woolley opening the library at Mottram St. Andrew Academy in Cheshire. Photo Credit: Mottram Academy. 

C.S. Woolley grew up in Cheshire and attended Mottram St. Andrew Academy, so the visit to open the library and run workshops with the pupils in year 3, 4, 5 and 6 was an extra special experience.

“It’s been an absolute honour and privilege to spend so much time with all the children in the schools this week. They were all so excited and had such creative ideas, it was really wonderful to be able to talk to them an answer so many questions.”

If you are interested in booking C.S. Woolley for a school or library visit please contact office@mightierthanthesworduk.com for more details.

However, that’s not all that’s happened this week for C.S. Woolley has also had 20 titles released. These are not titles that she did under the banner of Mightier Than the Sword UK but for a different publisher.

Foxton Books contracted C.S. Woolley to write a series of 20 books for them. These were rewrites of 20 literary classics that have been designed to help people learn English- whether they are children or adults.

The books include comprehension tests that she devised and Foxton Books found a stunningly talented illustrator to bring some of the moments from the books to life.

The titles so far are:

Level 1

  • The Wizard of Oz
  • Huckleberry Finn
  • The Adventure of the Speckled Band (Sherlock Holmes)
  • Anne of Green Gables
  • Dracula
  • The Prisoner of Zenda
  • The Lost World

Level 2

  • Moby Dick
  • Gulliver’s Travels
  • Alice in Wonderland
  • Sleepy Hollow
  • Treasure Island
  • Around the World in Eighty Days
  • Robinson Crusoe

Level 3

  • The Three Musketeers (one of C.S. Woolley’s favourite books)
  • Pocahontas
  • Oliver Twist
  • Frankenstein
  • Journey to the Centre of the Earth
  • Call of the Wild

You can find all of the books direct at Foxton Books or at Amazon, Foyles, Blackwell’s, the Book Depository, Wordery and Waterstones.

This takes the total of published books in C.S. Woolley‘s catalogue up to 58!

 

 

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penelope-wallace-author

We’re taking a break from posting news and short stories to bring you a brief interview with author Penelope Wallace.

Q. What is your name?
A. Penelope Wallace.

Q. What is your date of birth?
A. 28th June 1962.

Q. Where were you born?
A. St Andrews, Scotland.

Q. Where did you grow up?
A. St Andrews, Scotland.

Q. What is your favourite sport?
A. “Sport” is an interesting concept. I’ve never come to grips with it as a participant, but I like watching tennis.

Q. Where did you go to primary school?
A. St Andrews, Scotland.

Q. Where did you go to secondary school?
A. St Andrews, Scotland.

Q. Where did you go to university?
A. Finally leaving St Andrews… Oxford and Aberdeen.

Q. What is your favourite colour?
A. The colours of the sunset.

Q. What is your favourite film?
A. I usually say “Some Like It Hot”.

Q. Last film you saw at the cinema?
A. “Dr Strange.”

Q. Who is your favourite author?
A. People choose just one?

Q. What is your favourite book?
A. As above.

Q. What is the last book you read?
A. “Magnum Bonum” by Charlotte M Yonge, and “The Gospel of Dot” by Humphrey Clucas.

Q. Who is your favourite band?
A. What is a band?

Q. Have you ever seen them live?
A. No.

Q. Do you have a favourite song?
A. Whatever I can’t get out of my head, unless I hate the words.

Q. How long have you been writing?
A. I have been writing on and off since I was six, when I wrote a shortened version of “The Jungle Book”.

Q. Where do you get your inspiration from?
A. Speculation about a world without gender prejudice, miscellaneous ideas… and a man who walked into my head.

Q. So your friends and family are supportive?
A. They are, on the whole.

Q. Are you an animal lover?
A. I will take the Fifth Amendment on this one.

Q. Do you have other creative outlets besides writing?
A. I answer questions stupidly and recite poetry.

Q. What is your favourite flower?
A. Forget-me-not.

Penny Release Party Poster

WeDoNotKillChildren

Join local author Penelope Wallace for the launch party of a book that gives fantasy a facelift.

Released in November 2016, We Do Not Kill Children was heralded as the hot pick in Amazon’s Christian fantasy genre in the run up to Christmas and finally the book is getting a local not-quite-a-release party.

We Do Not Kill Children is the debut novel from local author, Penelope Wallace and published by the local publishing house, Mightier Than the Sword UK Publications. “It’s a fantasy book for people who don’t really like fantasy,” said Ms Wallace, “It’s a story without elves, it doesn’t end on a cliff-hanger and it’s free from misogyny. However it does have several murders plus a sprinkling of torture and dismemberment of corpses – which all adds to the intrigue.”

Penny Release Party PosterThe launch party is being held at the Middle Street Resource Centre, Middle Street, Beeston on 26th May 2017. The doors will open at 7pm, with talks starting at 7:30pm. Entry is free. There will be refreshments on offer for all those that attend, with the chance to meet the author and talk to her about her book (and the second Tale from Ragaris, which is due to be published later this year) as well as the opportunity to purchase a copy and have it signed. The illustrator for the books, Ian Storer of Scipio Design will also be in attendance with more examples of his work. C.S. Woolley, the founder of Mightier Than the Sword UK Publications and another local author, will also be there with some of the other books in the Mightier Than the Sword UK Publications catalogue available for purchase.

We Do Not Kill Children Blurb

“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

With the manuscript for the sequel to We Do Not Kill Children in the hands of our editors, we’ve decided to celebrate with an extract from Penelope Wallace‘s debut novel and transport all you lovely readers to the kingdom of Marod.

We Do Not Kill Children: An Extract

Meril woke early, but lay still and tense, shivering a little and dreading getting up.  It was hard to believe that they were really going to do this thing.

Master Hassdan had spent most of the day before arranging it.  He told her that nothing would make the inhabitants of the house accept a desecration of the children’s graves; any explanation he could offer would be regarded as an insult.  So Mistress Soumaki was to undertake further questioning of Lord Gahran’s people that afternoon, all together in the hall, to keep them out of the way.  Soumaki plainly thought this a waste of time, and a distraction from their task, and said so forcefully.  The possibility that the children might have been substituted was a very faint and unlikely one.  Hassdan was in charge of the mission, so she had to give way, but she did not like it.  Meril, excruciatingly embarrassed, had to witness their argument.

As they left the room, Master Hassdan had relieved his feelings by slapping the back of her head, and saying, “Take that smirk off your face.  Go and make yourself useful in the kitchens.”  While she was doing this, he exerted the authority of the King’s Thirty over the two reluctant priests, and talked to Captain Rabellit, whom Cremdar had left in charge.  The captain was willing to help, he told Meril, but she had to select the least talkative of her soldiers to assist.  “Not that there’s much hope.  Someone will surely let it out.

Meril, chopping vegetables and apologising for the ones she dropped on the floor, had been trying to learn what the dead children had looked like, but she had discovered little.  They were all little angels.  Gascor had a mole next to his eye.  Ilda’s hair was curly, and Filana’s straight.  This was all she could learn, apart from the colours of the clothes they had been wearing that day.

She had asked several people about the events of the funeral, and learned these by heart.  Cremdar, Arvill and Braf had wrapped the children in a sheet and sewn it together “out of respect”, before breaking the news and arresting Dorac.  The actual bodies had been too terrible to be viewed, after what that monster had done to them.   All anyone else had seen was the bloodstains on Dorac’s cloak, and on the floor, and seeping through the sheet… and the fact of the children’s absence.  The remains had lain in the chapel with those of their father for an hour or so, for last rites to be spoken, and people to pray.  Then they had been carried out into the grounds by Captain Rabellit and one of her soldiers, with everyone else following behind.  Lord Gahran’s chaplain had spoken the words of the funeral service, and all had wept and crowded round while the bloodied sheet was placed in the earth, in a hole dug by the soldiers.  The other body, that of the stablehand Arator, had been buried later.

“Very very odd,” commented Master Hassdan.  “Not even a coffin.”  It was clear, he said, and Meril earnestly agreed, that the people of Ferrodach could have had no part in anything suspicious after the murders, at any rate.  Captain Rabellit seemed trustworthy, and she was sure the grave had not been disturbed since.  When asked if Ferrodach had had enough warning of their arrival to organise a substitution, she had thought not.  “Our scouts saw nothing, and when we rode up, everyone was very surprised.  Or seemed to be.”

So today they were to dig up corpses.  Meril could not get her mind off this, wondering how horrible the sight and smell would be, and if she would disgrace herself utterly – throw up, or scream, or worse, in front of everyone.  She thought of pictures at home of the opening of the tombs at the Last Judgment, which had given her and her sister nightmares.  Her stomach was cold and heavy, and she could not make herself move from her pallet outside the Ferrodach guest chamber.

Meril!  You good-for-nothing brat!  Are you intending to sleep till noon?  St John preserve me from idle children.”  Hassdan kicked her up, and she stammered apologies.  He was still complaining loudly about her laziness and clumsiness as they went down to the hall (the same stair that Master Dorac and Master Cremdar had used that day), and Soumaki gave her a compassionate look.  It was almost funny.

 

We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.

For the third day of advent we are taking a trip to the world of Ragaris, created by Penelope Wallace. You may have seen that her debut novel is one of Amazon’s hot releases in the Christian Fantasy genre, so with the run up to the celebration of the birth of Christ, here’s a specially written short story of Christmas straight from the country of Marod.

If you want to find out more about her debt novel, We Do Not Kill Children, you can read more here. This tale takes place a few years before the events of her debut novel and is a wonderful story about the power of giving.

The Queen’s Gift

Every Christmas Eve, the city was darkened save for a single torch carried to the Cathedral by a girl on a donkey – and then candles and lamps and rushlights were lit for everyone to take home.

The light comes again: long ago and far away in Bethlehem, but somehow also here and now in Stonehill.

That year the royal family walked back with their lantern to sleep a little; and next morning, like other parents, the Queen and King gave their children gifts. To Princess Emmia they gave a new bow, and she stroked it lovingly. “Now I can defend myself.”

“Yes, but you must still take soldiers with you.” The Queen didn’t like to think of what had almost happened, six weeks ago.

“I won’t take that soldier, Mother.”

“I am not hearing this again. He saved your life.”

“And he disobeyed my orders, a Princess’s orders. I want him punished. Flog him, as a Christmas gift to me?” She put her head on one side with a childish smile, inappropriate in a woman of nineteen.

“An odd gift, I think. Run along and dress for Mass.”

Later came the Christmas feast in the Great Hall. After Advent plainness, the mere smell of meat – heavy, warm, almost solid – might have filled stomachs. The Hall was full of noise, and men and women in bright gowns and merry mood.

On the dais Queen Darisha sat with her family (husband, two sons, daughter, sister and brother-in-law) and selected guests. And when her people could spare a glance from the food, they looked up, and they seemed reassured.

She was fifty-two years old, and had reigned for eighteen years. Her face was round and motherly, so that royal dignity was always an effort, but her eyes, she hoped, were still sharp. On this glad day she wore a purple gown trimmed at the bodice with foreign lace, and at the sleeves with ermine, and on her piled –up grey-streaked hair she wore the crown of Marod, gold and pearl and a single sapphire.

Members of the Queen’s Thirty stood around the walls. The most beloved of all her servants, sworn to defend her with their lives.

Those at the High Table ate and drank and talked, and were careful always to look happy; and after a steady hour and a half the songs had been sung, the bones picked, and the plates emptied. Tables were pulled back to clear the centre of the Hall… and all looked up together, expectant like baby birds, with open beaks.

It was time for the Queen to do what Queens must: reward those who have proved loyal, bribe those who may need persuasion. The Christmas Giving.

She stood, and the herald called names, and happy people knelt to receive lands forfeited by criminals, or other gifts found or made. There was cheering.

The afternoon was fading, and the shutters were fastened. Light from the torches flickered, dancing on the familiar faces, changing them.

Finally. Her feet were aching. “Dorac, son of Araf, approach.”

Now, Emmia. Listen.

The young soldier had to be pushed towards the dais, stumbling a little. He was clean, but his dull jacket and hose were patched, and his hair tied back with string. A confused and unbeautiful face.

The Queen said, “Forty nights ago, a woman of this Court was set upon by scoundrels intending robbery, or perhaps rape and murder. You and another fought them off, killed or captured them. That deserves praise, and praise has been given. Then you were ordered to kill your prisoners, and you refused, because you said trial should come before punishment.”

Now he was looking very nervous.

“Kneel.

“I don’t know what happens elsewhere, but in this kingdom even the great should keep the law, and even the lowly may tell them so. Take this, Dorac, with my gratitude.”

And he looked up at her. She saw his face, his life, change. She almost wept.

The gift was a sword – good, but not extraordinary. She trusted it would serve him well. He took it as if he’d never seen one before, and had to be nudged by the Steward to get up, and bow, and walk away.

“Do you know, mother,” said the Princess afterwards, “he looked as if he’d never had a Christmas gift from anyone before.”

“Maybe he hadn’t.”

The Queen thought of her dear friends, her Queen’s Thirty. They would all be willing to die for her.

But Dorac, she thought, would feel that was too great a privilege.

We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.

It’s official, the debut novel from Penelope Wallace is here, and we couldn’t be more excited!

We Do Not Kill Children is out today across a wide range of platforms that include:

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App Store

iBooks UK

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iBooks US

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You can also find out more about We Do Not Kill Children in the books section of our site. You can get We Do Not Kill Children direct from our Etsy Store in digital and paperback format.

About We Do Not Kill Children

front“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.

 

Yes, the debut novel from Penelope Wallace is coming on 14th November!

We Do Not Kill Children is set in the fantasy realm of Ragaris, where the country of Marod can be found. We don’t want to give away too may details just yet, but we do have the cover art and the blurb to share with you all – besides the official release date.

front

“We do not kill children; we do not commit rape; we do not take pleasure in torment.”

Dorac Kingsbrother was one of the King’s Thirty in the kingdom of Marod. That was before he was found guilty of the murder of Lord Gahran’s three children. Though Gahran was a traitor, his children were innocent. The code of the King’s Thirty leaves no room for such a barbaric act, and for this heinous crime Dorac faces a life in exile.

The shame of such a sentence is something that Dorac can’t brook, and so he sets off on a journey to the Old Stones, the place where those that seek death meet their end. Followed by Gormad, a child in search of adventure, Dorac is not alone on his final journey.

But not everyone believes that Dorac is guilty. Gemara Kingsister, head of the Six, investigates the murder of Gahran’s children; though there is more at stake than the life of a lone warrior in this, the first of the Tales from Ragaris.

 

We will be releasing more details as it gets closer to the release date, so watch this space!

Sign up to our mailing list to get the latest news, releases and offers from Mightier Then the Sword UK.